Rochester, MN
888-399-7281 507-218-7935
St. Charles, MN
507-932-4461

3 actions that could get your green card revoked

As a green card holder, you might worry about your ongoing immigration status. You might be afraid of losing your green card and facing deportation. With all of the political immigration topics in the news every day, how can you be sure the government will not remove you from the country?

There are certain actions that may lead to your deportation, regardless of the political climate. Below is an overview of deportable actions and how you can maintain your lawful residence.

1. Voting as a U.S. citizen

With a green card, you can vote in certain elections at the state and local level that do not require you to be a U.S. citizen. Federal elections, on the other hand, require citizenship status. You cannot participate in federal elections as a supposed citizen.

Avoid registering to vote when renewing your driver license. If you accidentally fill out a voter registration form then use your license to vote, this could be grounds for deportation.

2. Abandoning permanent residence

You cannot simply establish a permanent residence – you must live there. At certain times, the government might ask you to prove your residence, such as when you are applying for citizenship or re-entering the U.S. after an international trip. Complications may arise when you stay out of the country for six months or more without first obtaining a re-entry permit. 

3. Committing a crime

Violating the law may lead to a green card revocation and deportation. It does not need to be a major felony crime. There is no strict list of exact crimes that result in deportation as it is dependent on the unique facts of your situation and how the law is written in Minnesota.

This is by no means an exhaustive list of every deportable offense. If you committed any crime or have questions regarding your status as a permanent residence, contact an immigration and criminal law attorney.

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information

Privacy Policy | Business Development Solutions by FindLaw, a Thomson Reuters business.